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Aphrodisiacs: Do they Attract the Opposite Sex?

Scientists are actually getting closer to pinning down the chemical in the “body chemistry” that may attract the opposite sex pheromones. Pheromones, those naturally produced chemicals emitted by all organisms, have been the topic of animal and insect studies for decades.

Now, human pheromones are under the microscope and the science community has high hopes that they may hold the key to what really turns us on.

Years ago, research proved that female moths emit the pheromones that ace as aphrodisiacs to attract the opposite sex. Additionally, it was discovered that male moths use their antennae to hone in on female pheromone emissions … and can do so even when exposed to a variety of other scents.

(This knowledge has actually been put to practical use.

Scientists have developed a means to protect crops

through the controlled release of pheromones that lure insects away from fields that they would otherwise eat.)

In the last decade, researcher Martha McClintock of the University of Chicago conducted a study that confirms that 68 percent of women participating in the study were affected by exposure to pheromones.

That information has sparked an interest in the scientific community.

Nature’s Love Potion Pheromones

Can human pheromones be collected … then released …to attract the opposite sex?

There are those who resoundingly say “yes” to that question.

They claim that some perfumes and oils containing animal and/or human pheromones do attract the opposite sex.

The concept of scents and other substances being used as aphrodisiacs is not new. In fact, aphrodisiacs can be traced back thousands of years.

And, although the Food and Drug Administration has yet to approve or recommend age-old aphrodisiacs or the use of bottled pheromones, the organization will recognize that because no official clinical studies have been completed on humans, claims that aphrodisiacs attract the opposite sex cannot be determined as fraudulent either.

Yohimbine … Erection Herb

In fact, the FDA has described studies involving the response of animals to the ancient aphrodisiac yohimbine as “encouraging.”

Yohimbine is extracted from the bark of a tree in Africa. Generations of natives used yohimbine to stimulate a man’s sexual appetite. The natural substance is said to affect the spinal nerve centers that control erections.

The herb is also known to increase blood flow throughout the body, including the penis. Some people claim that drinking small amounts of powdered yohimbine in tea increases sexual drive in humans.

Ginseng … Ancient Oriental Secret

Animal studies using ginseng have also produced positive results.

Ginseng is known to act as a stimulant when ingested and some claim it actually increases their sexual desire.

Long relied on as a central ingredient in many Oriental love potions, ginseng is thousands of years old.

Cardamom

The aromatic cardamom is another ancient herb attributed to increased sexual excitement. Arabs have long considered cardamom an aphrodisiac and ingest it in a potion made by breaking down the plant seeds in hot water.

Cardamom is known to not only stimulate more than a sexual appetite. The spice is heavily used in recipes that range from stew to desserts.

Native to India, the spice that is derived from the cardamom plant is very expensive.

Rhino Horn and Oysters

Historically, some aphrodisiacs developed a reputation for sexual stimulation because of the real impact that natural materials have on certain individuals. For example, a rhinoceros horn is loaded with calcium and phosphorus.

Should someone be deficient in either substance, ingesting horn powder might well produce an overall invigorating effect?

Another well-known alleged aphrodisiac is the oyster. High in zinc, oysters may also reasonably have a positive impact on someone whose body is lacking the substance.